Hutchesons Bar & Brasserie

Hitlisted
Hutchesons Bar & Brasserie
158 Ingram Street, Glasgow, G1 1EJ
  • Telephone 0141 552 4050
  • Opening times Mon–Fri 9am–midnight; Sat/Sun 10am–midnight.
  • Bar open Mon–Sun 11am–midnight
  • Food served Brasserie: Mon–Sat noon–10am Sun noon–9pm. Cafe: Mon-Fri noon–6pm; Sat noon–5pm; Sun noon–6pm.
  • Pre-theatre times Mon–Fri noon–6pm; Sat noon–5pm
  • Average price £15.95 (set lunch); £31 (evening meal)
  • Pre-theatre price £15.95
  • Email
  • Website hutchesonsglasgow.com
in association with
Birra Moretti
Hutchesons

Glitzy, luxurious dining in an A-listed Merchant City landmark, featuring café, brasserie and glamorous cocktail bar.

Eating & Drinking Guide

The 2016 edition of The List's Eating & Drinking Guide is out now – only £5.95 (+p&p).

This review is taken from the current (2016) edition.

With soft jazz music and beautifully ornate décor, dining at Hutchesons feels like being in a scene from The Great Gatsby. But it’s not all show in this striking Merchant City spot, housed in a 200-year-old, A-listed former hospital. The lavish surroundings are matched by exceptionally slick service, chic cocktails and a sophisticated menu showcasing the best of Scottish produce. Starters include smoked salmon – served simply with capers and lemon – smoky, delicate and perfect with a loaf of crisp, still warm bread, while the pleasing saltiness of the smoked ham hough is balanced with creaminess from a gently poached egg and freshly made hollandaise sauce. An extensive selection of Scottish steaks include a generously cut fillet, served with a pungent pepper sauce – it’s heavenly, and captures the fine-dining experience the restaurant aims for. Pan-seared chicken supreme is succulent and earthy in its mushroom and red wine jus. Finally, a crème brûlée – the crisp, caramelised sugar snapping to reveal a luxurious vanilla crème – is pleasantly decadent. An excellent example of just how glamorous Glasgow can be.

  • High point: An impressive all-round dining experience
  • Low point: Lighting a little low
  • Notable dish: The Hutcheson Platter - seafood on ice
Glasgow Larder

Listed in the Glasgow Larderorder a print copy (free + p&p).

For years Glasgow waited for life to return to the old Hutcheson Hospital, a glorious 19th-century building in the heart of the Merchant City. Following success with the Butchershop, James Rusk teamed up with the building’s owners The National Trust for Scotland to create an elegant restaurant that would shine in any city. From a cocktail bar and café on the ground floor, resplendent in marble, mirrors and palm fronds; to the sumptuous brassiere and its huge ornate ceiling, the restoration is glorious, but similar attention has been paid to the dining experience. The cocktail list is excellent and the menu is shaped from the best of Scotland’s larder. A meaty dressed crab to start is topped with shaved egg, while mixed shellfish on ice certainly looks the part. The quality continues into mains dominated by meat and seafood. A roasted monkfish tail shows there’s more to the kitchen than steak, though a fillet with scallops is immensely satisfying. A light blancmange served with raspberry sorbet rounds off a meal perfectly, but not even that can come close to the experience of being immersed in part of Glasgow’s architectural history.

  • Private dining: Up to 18 covers
  • Provides: Vegetarian options (at least ¼ main courses), Children's portions, Children's high chairs, Wheelchair access, Pre-theatre menu, Outdoor tables, Free wi-fi
  • Music on stereo: Jazz/Blues
  • Capacity: 85 (brasserie) / 55 (cafe-bar)
  • Largest group: 40
  • Open since: 2014
  • Number of wines sold by the glass: 15
  • House wine: £19 per bottle

Reviews & features

Restaurant review: Hutchesons

23 Sep 2014

Minute attention to culinary detail ensures quality dining in a beautifully restored building

Anyone wandering in the Merchant City will invariably have their eye drawn to the imposing and elegant Hutchesons’ Hall. Built as a hospital in the early 19th century (relocating from the Trongate, from where it had operated since the 1640s), the…