Vietnam House Restaurant

Vietnam House Restaurant
1–3 Grove Street, Edinburgh, EH3 8AF
Photo of Vietnam House Restaurant

Charming point of embarkation for a journey into Far Eastern flavours.

Eating & Drinking Guide

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Cheerful coloured lanterns hanging from the grassy thatched ceiling give Vietnam House a cosy yet exotic feel. Tucked into one of its two neat front rooms, diners might imagine they are visiting someone’s home rather than eating in a restaurant. Spring rolls may be ubiquitous on every takeaway menu but fresh spring rolls are a different beast – a cool, translucent envelope of rice paper encasing a crunchy tangle of vegetables, noodles and herbs. Wrapping on a different scale comes with the lotus rice – a heavyweight parcel of sticky rice, shredded chicken, shitake mushrooms and shrimps, all contained in a lotus leaf the size of some café tables. Unwrap to release steamy aromas and delicious smoky caramel flavours. Braised chicken comes in a tangy sauce that judiciously balances sweet and spicy notes. Though there's not much elbow room and a visit to the loo entails a sidle past fridges and dishwashers, service here is friendly and swift and the corkage charge very reasonable.

The List's rating
7.4

Menu

Cooking

Service

Ambience

Appeal

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Julie Morrice visited Vietnam House Restaurant on 13 March 2018
  • High point: Interesting, prettily presented food
  • Low point: Delicate flavours can sometimes verge towards bland
  • Notable dish: Lotus rice with chicken, shrimps and shitake mushrooms
  • Average price: £20 (lunch); £20 (dinner)
  • Private dining: Up to 16 covers
  • Provides: Vegetarian options (at least ¼ main courses), Wheelchair access, Free wi-fi
  • Capacity: 36
  • Largest group: 16
  • Open since: 2010
  • BYOB: £1.50 per person corkage

Reviews & features

Pho Vietnam House - Restaurant review

1 Feb 2011

Vietnamese cuisine represented well in west-end of Edinburgh

Vietnamese cuisine is hallowed by returning backpackers and adventurous tourists, but it’s poorly represented locally compared to other Far Eastern cuisines. David Pollock found a tiny outpost in western Edinburgh