63 Tay Street Restaurant

63 Tay Street Restaurant

Photo: Stephen Robinson

63 Tay Street Restaurant
63 Tay Street, Perth, PH2 8NN
  • Telephone 01738 441451
  • Food served Tue/Wed 5.45–9pm; Thu–Sat noon–2pm, 6.30–9.00pm. Closed Sun/Mon
  • Pre-theatre times Tue/Wed 5.45–7pm; Thu–Sat 6.30pm–7pm
  • Average price £20 (lunch); £39.50 (set evening meal)
  • Pre-theatre price £13.50
  • Email
  • Website www.63taystreet.co.uk
Eating & Drinking Guide

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This review is taken from the 2013 edition.

Perth’s dining scene has really been in the ascendancy in recent years with Graeme Pallister, chef patron at 63 Tay Street, at the forefront of the renaissance. After gaining experience in England he worked across Scotland before setting up his signature restaurant in his native Perthshire. He picked a prime spot just down by the banks of the lifeblood River Tay. Décor is as refined and understated as the solid stone building. His declared philosophy is ‘local, honest and simple’, but that slightly undersells Pallister. His sourcing is indeed impressively local and honest with Perthshire berries and mushrooms from Aviemore, not to mention lamb from Andrew Fairlie’s brother, but his food is more than simple. Oxtail and Stornoway black pudding comes laced with a duck egg and horseradish while the standout is sautéed local beef rib with crumbed oxtail, horseradish and potato gratin. The five-course dinner menu showcases his culinary skills, while the grill menu offers Aberdeen Angus fillet and ribeye. The wine list leans towards the New World, fitting in a sparkling restaurant that shows off the new face of Perth.

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'Local, Honest, Simple' runs chef/patron Graeme Pallister’s mantra. He may be Chef of the Year 2013 (Catering in Scotland Excellence Awards) but Pallister keeps his feet on the ground and his warmest welcome is reserved, not for Michelin, but for the master butcher, the cheesemaker and the friend who ‘chaps the window’ with a basket of foraged herbs or wild berries. But though he likes to keep things low-key, this is not parochial cooking and his menus marry traditional Scottish elements with occasional Thai flavours and vibrant spices. Lighter dishes for lunchtime might include a roast rump of lamb, with spiced sweetbreads and Scottish crowdie nestled in with the smoky aubergine purée, pink fir apple potatoes and earthily sweet beetroot. Dinner is a five-course fixed-price feast, and the wine list (Scottish beers and Blackwood’s Shetland vodka and gin included) must gladden the heart of many a local taxi driver. ‘Cheffy stuff’ isn’t likely to be missed. No 63 is civilised and polished place to linger over good food and wine.

  • Provides: Children's portions, Children's high chairs, Pre-theatre menu, Free wi-fi
  • Capacity: 34
  • Largest group: 39
  • Open since: 2001
  • Number of wines sold by the glass: 8
  • House wine: £21 per bottle

Reviews & features

Graeme Pallister, chef at Perth's 63 Tay Street, on Perthshire berries

1 May 2009

Chef's Choice

Nowhere else in the world encourages eclectic cookery more than Perthshire, and it’s no more evident than during our berry fruit season. For decades now our local farms have reigned supreme producing the finest strawberries, rasps and blueberries.